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Why Us

Rolling on three tracks

3-Tracks

Track One: We deliver great ideas wrapped up in an enterprise-wide marketing and PR strategy that will make you money, increase your franchise value and enhance your customer experience.

Track Two: We organize effective and affordable federal consumer compliance programs for banks, especially BSA/AML programs. This includes policies, training, fixing critical exam findings and software evaluation.

Track Three: We support marketing initiatives by creating technology, In just the past five years we have created, installed, trained and continue to support Web Portals, Intranets and other specialized applications for financial institutions and manufacturing clients.

For manufacturers:

  • Developed a device independent internet based database delivering for a manufacturer’s sales team. Database updated automatically, always current.
  • Converted traditional sales and advertising program to internet, including microsite, animated video, engineering interviews and downloadable sales flyers. Improved reach and reduced marketing costs by one-third

For financial institutions:

  • Developed an online Reg E Opt-In, Online Account Opening for banks,
  • Created a web-delivered Deposit Account Referral programs 24/7
  • Created a ADA friendly website to accommodate recent federal rules
  • Wrote website policy and procedure
  • Developed a DDOS defense of bank website

For bank trade associations:

  • We migrated paper-based membership data to an online, member-directed and fully searchable database – a neat little trick that saved our client $21K the first year and close to $50K in succeeding years.

In our 4 decades of experience, we’ve learned a thing or two. Put our market wisdom and business savvy to work for your institution.

How we fit in

fit_inWe are excellent business partners and project leaders. We deliver on-time, in-budget and as agreed. We’re good at herding cats and forming consensus. We build teams who are enthusiastic and focused on profitable, predictable results.

Current projects

  • Converting a Share Point Intranet into a system usable by humans
  • Management Dashboards to Monitor Key Processes
  • Building an iPad Application to Publish Product Catalogs
  • Building an On-Line Account Opening System for Loan and Deposit Accounts
  • Maintaining an Online Opt-In System
  • Deploying a Data-Driven Email Management System
  • Scripting a Full Motion Video and Animation Project to Demo New Technology
  • Creating assortment of web sites
  • Five-Year Marketing and Strategic Plan
  • Creating a Shelter Lending Campaign and Incentive Program
  • Migrating a printed membership directory online driven by a dynamic database
  • Coaching Executive Management on Delegating Skills
  • Driving a Management Succession PR Campaign
  • Creating a “Speak Up” Legislative Lobbying program

How we think

what_we_think_B
To get some insight into how we think, spend a few minutes browsing our blog. Some of the posts are outrageous and some are merely off the wall. Apple Blog You can read our bank compliance thinking here.

Obsessive service

We understand that a project has to be done when it’s supposed to be done. We’re set up to take on and deliver solutions 365/24/7. If that means working on weekends or being in a client’s office on Saturday, well, that’s what we do. From the beginning of the work scope we commit to a successful completion. And we stick to the plan. No matter what. (There’s a story about a show booth that somehow went missing on the way to Las Vegas that we could tell you – there’s also a story about a website that was mugged on a Saturday night.)

For us, it’s not all about the money

Our client relationships are not all about money. They are about earning respect and trust. Sometimes we do ‘value-added’ projects at no charge (see a partial list below). We like these opportunities to make human connections. Besides, every time we learn something valuable. The most important result: our clients understand that we don’t look at them and see only dollar signs.

  • Major community event Keynote Speech
  • Retirement Event for Company’s 20-year CEO
  • Quarterback client’s customer-facing quarterly
  • Prepare 10 minute business case presentation to Board of Directors
  • Prepare division level budget for fiscal year sales and marketing presentation to corporate

Brain-storming is free

We want to be one of the first people you call when you want to do some spit-balling or brain storming. So if you’re wrestling with how to get a project off and running — or trying to decide just exactly how to get your bank going in a good direction — call us. There’s never any charge for you to call, text or email us and get the benefit of what we’ve learned since our inception in 1972. If we have some research or history with your subject, we’ll provide it to you, no charge. Next time you want to bounce something off us, give us a call.

We’re not focused on the past

Our company has been around since 1972. We’ve seen a lot of things work; we’ve seen a lot of things fail. In all that time, we’ve learned that past success accounts for a little. It’s what you’re going to be doing in the next five years that defines you. We’re pretty good at knowing what’s coming and what it means for banks. We figure we can give a community bank a minimum of two years head start on any given marketing, technological or compliance imperative. That sound good to you?

Vertical integration.

We have a thriving business that runs along three tracks: marketing, compliance and technology. We have learned how to weave those three business specialties into practical, affordable solutions for our clients. We think a single knowledgeable source can save clients time, money and aggro. (If you’d like to see a list of projects we’re working on, you’ll find a current list on the same page as the above link, down a couple of screens.)

Next Step

Call for a quick, five-minute conversation: 800-521-0236.

We’ll provide references and you can give us a heads-up on your objectives. After that we will prepare a quick on-line meeting — probably GTM. At that point, you haven’t spent any money. If you like what you saw and heard, then we can talk budget and deliverable. Most proposals can be delivered in 48 hours, sometimes less. Most single track projects take 10 working days; some take considerably longer. But, we can work that out after we have our first talk. You can also send us a note using the comment form below.

What do doctor’s mistakes have to do with marketing?

I just ran across an article in the Wall Street Journal (see link below) about the biggest mistakes doctors make.  I was struck by the similarity to mistakes made by marketers.  True, marketing people aren’t in the life or death business — even if it seems that way sometimes.  However, recognizing pitfalls than can lead to bad outcomes should be a life-skill for marketers — as well as doctors.

The article cites 13 common mistakes.  Two of them are particularly useful reminders to marketers.  As you work to make good decisions, keep at least these two pitfalls in mind.

BAD DECISION PITFALL: OVERCONFIDENCE BIAS

The article explains, “A tendency to act on incomplete information, institutions or hunches.  Too much faith is placed in opinion instead of carefully gathered evidence.”

So, who among us has not regretted an impulsive decision, one with reverberating effects?  For example, the marketer who authorized promoting the Nova compact sedan in Spain with great fanfare. Only to discover that “Nova” meant “No Go” in Spanish.  Oops.  Some carefully gathered evidence would have been a good thing.

I remember a bank client of mine once decided, without any advance notice to customers (this was before the TISA regulations), to convert all their free checking accounts to $4.99 per month.  This decision was made in reliance upon a profitability consultant with no consultation with anyone else — least of all the marketing department.  My client put the change into effect within 24 hours of the decision.  In the first 7 days, the bank lost 30% of those accounts, taking $7 million in deposits with them.  Did I tell you the bank was a $400 million bank?  Yes, a clear cut case of overconfidence bias.

BAD DECISION PITFALL: BANDWAGON EFFECT

This is defined as “The tendency for people on a medical team to believe and do certain things because many others are doing so.”

We’ve all seen this happen a bunch of times.  Most recently companies have launched major-big-time Facebook programs, mostly because one of their peers have done one.  So, off they go with not a scrap of strategy in sight.  Typically, the program bombs and all around the company you hear Facebook being roundly condemned.  (This is an example of the article’s “Fundamental Attrition Error.”  As in, the failure was Facebook, not us.)

What is needed is more careful, analytical thinking and less headlong decision making.  Before pulling the trigger, take a break and ask yourself, “Have I really thought through the implications of what I’m about to do?  Have I carefully considered all the outcomes?  Am I prepared to live with the consequences (loss of market share, wasted resources, etc.) that may ensue?

We have to make decisions every day.  Let’s take a moment and be sure we’re making a good one.

Want to talk over ways to make better marketing decisions?  Email me with MISTAKES in the subject line.  Remember, it never costs anything to share our experience.

SOURCE LINK: The Wall Street Journal (November 17, 2013). http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304402104579151232421802264?KEYWORDS=mistakes+doctors+make

 

 

Senior Bankers: How long has it been since you ate in the employee break room?

150 feeet

It’s a sign that you have arrived.  I’m talking about when you become a senior manager.  You get an office removed from the rest.  You now get to use the executive break room and bathroom.  Yep, you’re special alright.  Now, for the bad news: you have also been isolated from the action and, more importantly, from the customer experience. In a year or less, you are likely to be a complete stranger to what’s really going on in your bank.

Maybe it’s not a good idea to become isolated from where the real work is done.

You may be interested to read this article about Google’s HQ in NYC. Their office is designed to deliberately mix up employees from different areas and with different responsibilities.  This mash-up of execs with the worker bees has a very desirable outcome: People with similar attitudes are more likely to get along; however, those with diverse backgrounds are more likely to generate novel ideas. 

The key point: none of those interactions exist without the primary ingredient of casual encounters and unexpected conversations.  Nothing like eating together and bumping into each other on the way to the john.

Here’s how to try out this concept: bring your lunch in a Spiderman lunch box.  That should be good for some conversation starters.  Get to the lunch room early and hang out until the 1pm lunch crowd shows up.  Go out of your way to say hello and “what’s up.”  Pay attention to what you’re told.  When you hear something you can act on, do it. (Nothing encourages the troops more than discovering that that the bigwigs will actually listen and do.)

Do this for two months.  I bet you get at least two really good, inexpensive to implement, ideas your bank can use.  If I’m wrong, I’ll  buy you lunch and meet  you in the break room.

Oh, and here’s some ideas for your new lunchbox

 

 

Are We Losing the Small Bank?

The popular wisdom is that banks under $300 million are doomed.  It doesn’t have to be that way.

The business press (and maybe the banking lobby) are beating the drum these days.  “Smalls won’t survive.  Smalls can’t afford current compliance costs with new regulation.  Smalls can’t afford capital — even if they could get it.  Smalls can’t earn enough to survive.”  If you’re a banker, you know the story.

I suppose all of that may be true for some small bankers. But, I don’t think it has to be true for any small bank.

I think a banker who concentrates on his customer and who isn’t trying “to be a big bank” can pretty easily survive and thrive.  Here’s why I say that: (1) the current compliance climate is tough, but it’s not impossible; (2) bank technology is a complete mess that will take lots of money to fix, but there are alternatives out there; and (3) the number of customers it takes to make money is surprisingly small, so you don’t have to have a 50% market share to make money.

I’d recommend that small banks take a weekend retreat and follow two rules: (1) nobody can say “we can’t”, and (2) everybody has to figure out “how we can.”  With wit, intelligence, willingness to be creative and, most of all, bloody-minded persistence, small banks can do just fine.

Want to talk about how you can structure a “re-invention weekend?”  Call me and let’s talk. 

Remember, there’s never a fee to brainstorm solutions.  I’ll pay for the call: 800-521-0236, Ext 17.  Or, email me and put SURVIVE in the subject line.

 

Looking for an Ad Agency? Check out our First-Time-Free program.

Money always matters.

Almost nobody has the luxury of leaving money out of a agency decision.  No matter how good a deal looks, no matter how good the fit between the parties, money can be a deal breaker.  Speaking for ourselves, we don’t want money to be the reason we miss a great opportunity with a prized client.

So, we have a way to make it not all about the money.

For clients that look promising to us, we’ll make them this offer: first project we do, we’ll do for free.  How does it work?  It’s simple.  The client has to talk to us, give us really usable information, including a clear sense of mission.  We’ll respond with prelim copy and art (including images).  We’ll do that as often as it takes to until the client is happy.  Then, we’ll finish project by providing final deliverable.  When that’s done we’ll send a bill that itemizes all the fees and charges with a bottom line that credits the full amount.

Are we crazy? 

Nope.  At least, not about this.  It seems fair to us.  The client has the greatest business risk.  And, there are lots of advertising people out there.  So, to add some clarity, we’ll take the money out of the equation.  We figure clients will like it and come back.

What happens if a client screws us, takes the idea and never comes back?  Well, that could happen.  That’s our risk.  But, if it does happen, we won’t die, or cry, we’ll just move on.  After all, there’s some good that comes from the exercise.

There’s got to be a catch.

Yeah, actually there are two – but they’re little stuff.  First, out-of-pocket costs, like media, production, photography and stuff like that are on the client.  Second, we aren’t going down this road if the client can’t reasonably commit to a future relationship, even a modest one.

We’ve never lost a client over money.

Not in our entire 40 year history.  So, we think we understand this money thing :)

So, this sound good to you?

 Well, great.  Let’s get started.  Drop us an email with “FIRST TIME” in the subject line.  We’ll get right back to you.

 

Seven reasons we’re much more than an ad agency.

Your people + our people = a great team

Our clients tell us our ability to manage projects and convert insiders into effective  team members is a rare skill.  After all, almost no banking project is a solo exercise.  There are overlapping departments, and often some complicated IT issues, in play.  Our business wisdom, market savvy and great people skills provide what’s needed to get complicated projects over the goal line – on time and under budget.  When you introduce us into the mix, you don’t get hot air and out-of-date solutions.  You get effective leadership and up-to-date subject currency.

We’re a leader in inventing marketing niche technology.

We hear this a lot, “What’s a marketing firm doing creating program code to connect bank CIF with a web-delivered data request?”  Thing is, we’ve been creating technology solutions that accomplish marketing and compliance goals since 1980 when we jointly developed one of the first MCIF application in the US.  After that, we never looked back.  At least half-dozen times a year we fill a client need with a program interface to solve a thorny customer-facing problem.  In the past few years we have created: online Reg E Opt-In forms that were connected to the CIF, web-delivered Deposit Account Referral programs for customers to login and make account referrals 24/7, migrated paper-based membership data to an online, member-directed database – a neat little trick that saved our client $21K the first year and close to $50K in succeeding years.  What can our technology geeks do for you?  (If you’d like to see a a demo of our technology, please go drop us an email with TECHNOLOGY in the subject line.)

Concierge-level customer service.

We understand that a project has to be done when it’s supposed to be done.  Getting it done, on time and in budget is pretty much all there is to the issue.  We can pretty much take on and deliver solutions 365/24/7.  (There’s a story about a 10’ show booth that somehow went missing on the way to Las Vegas that we could tell you – there’s also a story about a website that was mugged on a Saturday night.)  If that means working on weekends or being in a client’s office on Saturday, well, that’s what we do.  From the beginning of the work scope we commit to a successful completion.  And we stick to the plan.  No matter what.

We don’t aspire to 100% billable hours.

Our client relationships are not all about money.  They are about earning respect and trust.  Sometimes we do ‘value-added’ projects at no charge (see a partial list here).  We like these opportunities to make human connection.  Besides, we always learn something valuable.  The most important result: our clients understand that we don’t look at them and see only dollar signs.

We’ve don’t charge for brainstorming.

We want to  be one of the first people you call when you want to do some spit-balling or brain storming.  So if you’re wrestling with how to get a project off and running — or trying to decide just exactly how to get your bank going in a good direction — call us.  There’s never any charge for you to call, text or email us and get the benefit of what we’ve learned since our inception in 1972.  If we have some research or history with your subject, we’ll provide it to you, no charge.  Next time you want to bounce something off us, give us a call, toll free, 800-521-0236.

We’re not hung up on our past success.

Our company has  been around since 1972.  We’ve seen a lot of things work; we’ve seen a lot of things fail.  In all that time, we’ve learned that the past counts for a little.  It’s what you’re going to be doing in the next five years that defines you.  We’re pretty good at knowing what’s coming and what it means for banks.  We figure we can give a community bank a minimum of two years head start on any given marketing, technological or compliance imperative.  That sound good to you?

We are obsessed with vertical integration.

We have a thriving business that runs along three tracks: marketing, compliance and technology.  We have learned how to weave those three business specialties into practical, affordable solutions for our clients.  We’ll provide some case histories that will give you insight into how our vertical integration makes our clients money — just send us an email with CASE HISTORY in the subject line.  We think a single knowledgeable source can save clients time, money and aggro.  (If you’d like to see a list of projects we’re working on now, please drop us an email with PROJECTS in the subject line.)

 

Why we’re a great marketing resource.

We’re intensely focused on customer service.

If it’s important to you, it’s important to us.  We’re not happy until you’re happy.  And, by extension of that principle, we’re devoted to preserving, extending and amplifying your relationship with your customer.  We know you don’t take your customers for granted, and neither do we.

We’re market wise.

We know how to divine the mind of the market.  We understand the psychology and psychographics of banking customers and what it takes to move them.  We have a strong research orientation, so our heart doesn’t overrule our head.

We’re industry savvy. 

We been successfully marketing and advertising to consumers and businesses since 1972.  We live and work at the intersection of Marketing, Advertising, IT Support, Research and Compliance.  We can produce good stuff for clients after the first hour on the job because we’ve been there and “done that.”

We’re creative where it counts.

We think it’s important to have advertising that is read and produces sales, and we don’t necessarily believe in doing things the way they’ve always been done.  We’re also not afraid to tell a client if we think he’s setting himself up to fail.

We’re responsive.

We operate our business 24/7, and we’re wired to the world, to each other and to our clients.  We’ve repaired website problems on Friday nights. And we flew to Las Vegas on a Sunday to spend 45 minutes fixing a display panel that had been damaged in transit.  These are just two reasons our client retention averages 20 years.  We almost never lose a client unless the company is merged or acquired.

We’re passionate about the Brand.

We believe a business has to stand for something, something that’s important to the client’s customers.  If a client doesn’t know why the company is important to its stakeholders–and doesn’t think the brand is vital to survival–there’s no future in our relationship.

We’re affordable. 

Our average blended, or combined, hourly rate is about a third less than our larger competitors.  We get more done for less.  That’s probably among the reasons one of the world’s largest manufacturers has been our client for over a decade.

We have great people.

Our dozen creative, motivated associates cover all the bases: copywriting, art, design, photography (still and video), copy and video editing, print and video production, proofreading, PR, and account services.  Our team is stable, but it’s growing.  We also have some wonderful strategic partners, people we’ve worked with for more than 20 years.

We believe in ROI.

We know how to develop and live by a budget.  Because we buy for multiple clients, we can leverage purchases to our clients’ advantage. Dealing with printers, film houses, service bureaus, photographers, and other specialists can be demanding, and it requires technical knowledge. One way we earn our keep is by providing expert services like these.

We’re really into technology.

We know how to build black boxes that will gather and distribute data–in a secure fashion– to accomplish your business goals.  We’ve built electronic dashboards for senior executives to monitor key business metrics; we built one client unique “bounce-proof analysis software” that let them run their own overdraft protection program (and save huge third-party fees), and we’ve built a secure link for bank clients– deliverable now–to implement online account opening.

We’re responsible. 

We take full responsibility for delivering a commercially acceptable product to our clients.  If you don’t like our work, you don’t pay our fees.

We know the difference between sales and marketing.

Sales and marketing are separate processes. Sales benefit the company; marketing benefits the customer.  The ultimate purpose of marketing (and branding) is to make sales efforts unnecessary.

Wealth Management: Measure Twice, Cut Once

You can learn from my grandfather.

My grandfather (the non-Scotch/Irish one) was a first class finish carpenter.  He worked on the cabinetry in the library of the Biltmore House.  During the depression, he was also a family-farmer who learned how to live on air and about ten acres of scrub pine.  He raised six children, and at least one grandson, retired debt free and had land left over to give to all of his kids.

Part of his success was his “Measure Twice, Cut Once” way of looking at things.  He was a planner —when I was younger, I used to say “plodder” – but he always, ALWAYS, mulled things over from every conceivable direction before he took any action.  Honest to God, I used to tell my mother that I was amazed he got his boots tied before noon.

But, there are cases when a careful, thoughtful approach to marketing is more than called for.

If there was ever a “Measure Twice, Cut Once” bank program, deploying Wealth Management would be on top of the list.   It’s one of the hardest things a community bank will ever do.  It seems so simple and rational; and the concept has a certain synchronized symmetry about it.  But, like Lee at Gettysburg, Wealth Management almost always turns out to a be harder battle than it looks.

Before you start a Wealth Management Program, take a long, sober look at the market.
You may well elect to pass.

Where most banks stumble is here: the customer’s expectation of a bank’s Wealth Management program is far higher than that which is commonly envisioned by community bankers.  Bankers very frequently underestimate what’s required.   It is precisely this disconnect that bodes ill, and ultimately brings on failure.

So, fair warning: if the bank isn’t willing to meet the customer expectations, the Wealth Program won’t work well, if at all.  There are two reasons Wealth Programs often tank:

The bank underestimates the savvy of potential Wealth customers.  Many, if not most, are a cynical bunch from the get-go; they are quick to detect if the bank is only talking the talk.   Understand, we’re not talking about Joe Customer.  We’re talking about Joseph P. Customer, III.  He ain’t chopped liver.  He knows what wealth is; he knows what wealth management is.  He expects what amounts to Concierge Service.  If you don’t give it to him, best case, he’ll ignore you. Worst case, he’ll make fun of you, publically.

A wealth manager is expected to have a wide ranging, executive ability that cuts across bank department lines.  Wealth customers expect to work with a banker  who can make decisions that interface with the customer’s entire circumstance. Also, they want  a banker who isn’t  going to be cycled out of the department in a year to two, like a typical loan officer or business center manager.  The minute a wealth manager says, “I need to bring along Mr. X, who is in charge of this department…” you have failed.  Now we’re talking a Wealth Clerk.  That’s not the same thing as Wealth Management.

To be successful in wealth management, the bank has to carefully consider three things:

Exactly who is the target market?  Once we know that, we then can know what kind of products and services we need to offer.  There will be a discovery process.  Probably some prelim visits to do some “needs assessment”.  And, this discovery needs to have some fairly high thresholds.  Maybe household assets, including the home, in excess of $2 million, or assets of $1 million, not counting the home, or maybe securities and/or bank CDs in excess of $1 million.

And you need to know where they live, how many kids, parents, what schools, employment, whether they have ever appeared in the newspaper (good or bad).  Pull a lifestyle list.  No kidding, you need to  know all of this,  and more.

Next, we need to know if they are currently banked.  And, here is another place the wheels may come off.  Here’s where a bank has to decide who’s going to call on (and be responsible for the development of) these customers.   If the responsibility for these customers is fractured and split between different departments things can go south pretty quickly.  In fact,  presto, the program is half way to failure. (Well, that was easy.  Maybe you should just go ahead and fail now and get it over with.)

Exactly which services will your bank offer to Wealth Management customers?

Chief among them should be Personal and Business LOANS.  So, our Wealth Manager has to be the right person, someone who is savvy enough to make credit decision.  Remember, these Wealth Customers are not mushrooms.  You can’t treat them as such.  The bank will need the right products to appeal to them.  (And, on that subject, I respectfully suggest you do some soul-searching about the viability of your Cash Management/RDC services in this market segment.)  If they don’t like the service, you may become like King James, who speaking of the Scotts, said, “They are supposed to be loyal to the Crown, but they have become damnably fierce enemies with exceedingly long memories.”

Exactly who will be your Wealth Management bankers? 

These bankers need to be smart, savvy and nimble.  The have to able to court customers and finesse bank executives.  In short, these people need to be some of the sharpest knives in the drawer.  That means three things: (a) they need to be paid well and (b) trained well and (c) provided substantial resources so they can stay in front of customers.  (I’d be in favor of doing IQ testing and not recruiting any body under 130.)  They should be good at math and psychology.  They need to have a  big ego; and they need to be smart enough to be humble and self-effacing as required.   So, unless you really have the right person, you should not start this wealth program.  Remember, the potential wealth customer is discriminating.  You don’t want to send the “B” team.  You have one chance to get this right.  If you blow it, you’ll be a long time getting it back.

Still, can’t wait to get into Wealth Management? 

I have a summary of what a bank needs to launch.  Email me with WEALTH MANAGEMENT in the subject line and I’ll send it to you.

What is the best way to get your message to customers and potential customers? Electronic? Or, paper?

Everybody knows that electronic communication is faster, less expensive and reaches a greater number of people. So, of course, electronic communication is better than paper-based mail, right? Um, well, maybe not.
Pingdom.com graphic

Infographic source: royal.pingdom.com
According to a study by branding agency Millward Brown paper communication may have some significant advantages. They used MRI brain scans to see how the brain processed paper-based ads vs. digital based ads. As it turned out, paper communication caused more emotional processing and left a deeper footprint in the brain. So using, for example, traditional direct mail can create a more “real” experience for the customer. Of course, paper ads do not have video, audio or interactivity, but then, those enhancements may not be necessary for every message.
There is also some the matter of how much email actually hits the Inbox and does it get read? Seems there are over 39.6 billion emails sent out per day in the United States alone. With the US Census showing a population of over 310 million, that is over 125 emails per person per day for every man, woman and child in the country. (Actually it seems like I get 18 million of those emails everyday.) With such staggering email volume, it’s hard to believe all email is getting read – and that’s what spam filters do anyway, right? Protect us from that incessant barrage of email. How many emails die a slow, agonizing (but thoroughly deserved) death in the collective Junk Mailboxes of the world?

So what is the best way to get your message out? Paper or electronic? There is no one “best” answer to this question. You should review your company, your message, your customers (and potential customers) and make the most balanced decision you can. For sure, there are no automatic answers.

10 great strategies to market well

Good marketing strategies, tried and true, are hard to pin down these days, perhaps because they are hard to articulate in few words or because of the bewildering new media and shifting market base.

However, there’s help, from the excellent book Kellogg on Marketing. In the book you’ll find ten elements of a good marketing strategy.  These elements are receiving a lot of attention by smart people in business.  We’re including them in our client’s marketing plans – and we think you should including them in your plans, as well.  (Here’s the best part: they are easy to understand and measure.)

The table below came from research notes we did for a client back in 2002-3. It proved helpful in focusing the content of boardroom presentations and in preparing various communications.  The attributes are still in play and performing well. We hope this list (and the book) will be helpful to you, too, as you seek to innovate in today’s new market.

Look to see which ones your company has employed is or is working to employ. Which ones have you found to be most effective? Which ones haven’t you pursued that merit attention?  Email me at zself@appleadv.com to let me know what you think.

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